/usr/local/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf




#
#
#                   PostgreSQL HOST ACCESS CONTROL FILE
#
# 
# This file controls what hosts are allowed to connect to what databases
# and specifies some options on how users on a particular host are
# identified. It is read each time a host tries to make a connection to a
# database.
#
# Each line (terminated by a newline character) is a record. A record
# cannot be continued across two lines.
# 
# There are 3 kinds of records:
# 
#   1) comment:  Starts with #.
# 
#   2) empty:  Contains nothing excepting spaces and tabs.
# 
#   3) record: anything else.  
# 
# Only record lines are significant.
#
# A record consists of tokens separated by spaces or tabs. Spaces and
# tabs at the beginning and end of a record are ignored as are extra
# spaces and tabs between two tokens.
#
# The first token in a record is the record type. The interpretation of
# the rest of the record depends on the record type.


# Record type "host"
# ------------------
# 
# This record identifies a set of network hosts that are permitted to
# connect to databases. No network hosts are permitted to connect except
# as specified by a "host" record. See the record type "local" to specify
# permitted connections for local users via UNIX domain sockets.
#
# Format:
# 
#   host DBNAME IP_ADDRESS ADDRESS_MASK AUTHTYPE [AUTH_ARGUMENT]
# 
# DBNAME is the name of a PostgreSQL database, "all" to indicate all
# databases, or "sameuser" to restrict a user's access to a database with
# the same user name.
#
# IP_ADDRESS and ADDRESS_MASK are a standard dotted decimal IP address
# and mask to identify a set of hosts. These hosts are allowed to connect
# to Database DBNAME. There is a separate section about AUTHTYPE below.


# Record type "hostssl"
# ---------------------
#
# The format of this record is identical to that of "host".
#
# This record identifies the authentication to use when connecting to a
# particular database via TCP/IP sockets over SSL. Note that normal
# "host" records are also matched - "hostssl" records can be used to
# require a SSL connection. This keyword is only available if the server
# is compiled with SSL support enabled.


# Record type "local"
# ------------------
# 
# This record identifies the authentication to use when connecting to a
# particular database via a local UNIX socket.
#
# Format:
# 
#   local DBNAME AUTHTYPE [AUTH_ARGUMENT]
#
# The format is the same as that of the "host" record type except that
# the IP_ADDRESS and ADDRESS_MASK are omitted. Local supports only
# AUTHTYPEs "trust", "password", "crypt", and "reject".


# Authentication Types (AUTHTYPE)
# -------------------------------
#
# AUTHTYPE is a keyword indicating the method used to authenticate the
# user, i.e. to determine that the user is authorized to connect under
# the PostgreSQL username supplied in his connection parameters.
#
#   trust:  	No authentication is done. Trust that the user has the
#   		authority to use whatever username he specifies.
#
#   password:	Authentication is done by matching a password supplied
#   		in clear by the host. If AUTH_ARGUMENT is specified then
#   		the password is compared with the user's entry in that
#   		file (in the $PGDATA directory). See pg_passwd(1). If it
#   		is omitted then the password is compared with the user's
#   		entry in the pg_shadow table.
#
#   crypt:  	Same as 'password', but authentication is done by
#   		encrypting the password sent over the network.
#
#   ident:  	Authentication is done by the ident server on the remote
#   		host, via the ident (RFC 1413) protocol. AUTH_ARGUMENT,
#   		if specified, is a map name to be found in the
#   		pg_ident.conf file. That table maps from ident usernames
#   		to PostgreSQL usernames. The special map name "sameuser"
#   		indicates an implied map (not found in pg_ident.conf)
#   		that maps every ident username to the identical
#   		PostgreSQL username.
#
#   krb4:   	Kerberos V4 authentication is used.
#
#   krb5:   	Kerberos V5 authentication is used.
#
#   reject: 	Reject the connection.


# Examples
# --------
#
# TYPE       DATABASE    IP_ADDRESS    MASK                AUTHTYPE  MAP
# 
#host         all         127.0.0.1    255.255.255.255     trust     
# 
# The above allows any user on the local system to connect to any
# database under any username.
#
#host         template1   192.168.93.0 255.255.255.0       ident     sameuser
# 
# The above allows any user from any host with IP address 192.168.93.x to
# connect to database template1 as the same username that ident on that
# host identifies him as (typically his Unix username).
#
#host         template1   192.168.12.10 255.255.255.255    crypt
# 
# The above allows a user from host 192.168.12.10 to connect to
# database template1 if the user's password in pg_shadow is
# supplied. User passwords are optionally assigned when a 
# user is created.
#
#host         all        192.168.54.1  255.255.255.255     reject
#host         all        0.0.0.0       0.0.0.0             trust
#
# The above would allow anyone anywhere except from 192.168.54.1 to
# connect to any database under any username.
#
#host         all        192.168.77.0  255.255.255.0       ident     omicron
#
# The above would allow users from 192.168.77.x hosts to connect to any
# database, but if Ident says the user is "bryanh" and he requests to
# connect as PostgreSQL user "guest1", the connection is only allowed if
# there is an entry for map "omicron" in pg_ident.conf that says "bryanh"
# is allowed to connect as "guest1".
#

# Meine Einträge:
host         root   192.168.128.125   255.255.255.0     trust 
host	     geronimo 	192.168.128.125  255.255.255.0    trust
host	     xml 		192.168.128.125  255.255.255.0    trust 

# By default, allow anything over UNIX domain sockets and localhost.
local        all                                           trust
host         all         127.0.0.1     255.255.255.255     trust